Multiple Sclerosis Awareness 2020

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a condition that can affect the brain and spinal cord, causing a wide range of potential symptoms, including problems with vision, arm or leg movement, sensation or balance.

It’s a lifelong condition that can sometimes cause serious disability, although it can occasionally be mild.

In many cases, it’s possible to treat symptoms. Average life expectancy is slightly reduced for people with MS.

It’s most commonly diagnosed in people in their 20s and 30s, although it can develop at any age. It’s about 2 to 3 times more common in women than men.

MS is 1 of the most common causes of disability in younger adults.

Symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS)

The symptoms of MS vary widely from person to person and can affect any part of the body.

The main symptoms include:

  • fatigue
  • difficulty walking
  • vision problems, such as blurred vision
  • problems controlling the bladder
  • numbness or tingling in different parts of the body
  • muscle stiffness and spasms
  • problems with balance and co-ordination
  • problems with thinking, learning and planning

Depending on the type of MS you have, your symptoms may come and go in phases or get steadily worse over time (progress).

Getting medical advice

See a GP if you’re worried you might have early signs of MS.

The early symptoms often have many other causes, so they’re not necessarily a sign of MS.

Let your GP know about the specific pattern of symptoms you’re experiencing.

If they think you could have MS, you’ll be referred to a specialist in conditions of the nervous system (a neurologist), who may suggest tests such as an MRI scan to check for features of MS.

Types of multiple sclerosis (MS)

MS starts in 1 of 2 general ways: with individual relapses (attacks or exacerbations) or with gradual progression.

Relapsing remitting MS

More than 8 out of every 10 people with MS are diagnosed with the relapsing remitting type.

Someone with relapsing remitting MS will have episodes of new or worsening symptoms, known as relapses.

These typically worsen over a few days, last for days to weeks to months, then slowly improve over a similar time period.

Relapses often occur without warning, but are sometimes associated with a period of illness or stress.

The symptoms of a relapse may disappear altogether, with or without treatment, although some symptoms often persist, with repeated attacks happening over several years.

Periods between attacks are known as periods of remission. These can last for years at a time.

After many years (usually decades), many, but not all, people with relapsing remitting MS go on to develop secondary progressive MS.

In this type of MS, symptoms gradually worsen over time without obvious attacks. Some people continue to have infrequent relapses during this stage.

Around half of people with relapsing remitting MS will develop secondary progressive MS within 15 to 20 years, and the risk of this happening increases the longer you have the condition.

Primary progressive MS

Just over 1 in 10 people with the condition start their MS with a gradual worsening of symptoms.

In primary progressive MS, symptoms gradually worsen and accumulate over several years, and there are no periods of remission, though people often have periods where their condition appears to stabilise.

What causes multiple sclerosis (MS)?

MS is an autoimmune condition. This is when something goes wrong with the immune system and it mistakenly attacks a healthy part of the body – in this case, the brain or spinal cord of the nervous system.

In MS, the immune system attacks the layer that surrounds and protects the nerves called the myelin sheath.

This damages and scars the sheath, and potentially the underlying nerves, meaning that messages travelling along the nerves become slowed or disrupted.

Exactly what causes the immune system to act in this way is unclear, but most experts think a combination of genetic and environmental factors is involved.

Treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS)

There’s currently no cure for MS, but a number of treatments can help control the condition.

The treatment you need will depend on the specific symptoms and difficulties you have.

It may include:

  • treating relapses with short courses of steroid medicine to speed up recovery
  • specific treatments for individual MS symptoms
  • treatment to reduce the number of relapses using medicines called disease-modifying therapies

Disease-modifying therapies may also help to slow or reduce the overall worsening of disability in people with a type of MS called relapsing remitting MS, and in those with a type called secondary progressive MS who have relapses.

Unfortunately, there’s currently no treatment that can slow the progress of a type of MS called primary progressive MS, or secondary progressive MS in the absence of relapses.

Many therapies aiming to treat progressive MS are currently being researched.

Living with multiple sclerosis (MS)

If you have been diagnosed with MS, it’s important to take care of your general health.

Outlook

MS can be a challenging condition to live with, but new treatments over the past 20 years have considerably improved the quality of life of people with the condition.

MS itself is rarely fatal, but complications may arise from severe MS, such as chest or bladder infections, or swallowing difficulties.

The average life expectancy for people with MS is around 5 to 10 years lower than average, and this gap appears to be getting smaller all the time.

Charities and support groups for multiple sclerosis (MS)

There are 2 main MS charities in the UK:

These organisations offer useful advice, publications, news items about ongoing research, blogs and chatrooms.

They can be very useful if you, or someone you know, has just been diagnosed with MS.

World Cancer Day 2020

World Cancer Day every 4 February is the global uniting initiative led by the Union for International Cancer Control (UICC). By raising worldwide awareness, improving education and catalysing personal, collective and government action, we’re working together to reimagine a world where millions of preventable cancer deaths are saved and access to life-saving cancer treatment and care is equal for all – no matter who you are or where you live. 

Created in 2000, World Cancer Day has grown into a positive movement for everyone, everywhere to unite under one voice to face one of our greatest challenges in history.

Each year, hundreds of activities and events take place around the world, gathering communities, organisations and individuals in schools, businesses, hospitals, marketplaces, parks, community halls, places of worship – in the streets and online – acting as a powerful reminder that we all have a role to play in reducing the global impact of cancer.

This year’s World Cancer Day’s theme, ‘I Am and I Will’,is all about you and your commitment to act. We believe that through our positive actions, together we can reach the target of reducing the number of premature deaths from cancer and noncommunicable diseases by one third by 2030.

Join us on 4 February and speak out and stand up for a cancer-free world.

Our time to act is now.

The Makeup Stall Alhambra

Barnsley Local TV had the opportunity to interview Charlie from The Makeup Stall Alhambra unfortunately this business is up for sale so if you are a makeup enthuses then get in contact via the links below.

FACEBOOK – https://www.facebook.com/TheMakeupStallAlhambra/
INSTAGRAM – https://www.instagram.com/themakeupstallalhambra/

Robyn Eliza MUA
FACEBOOK – https://www.facebook.com/robynelizamua/

Raynaud's Awareness 2020

Raynaud’s disease (Ray-nose) is where the small blood vessels in the extremities such as hands and feet, fingers or toes are over-sensitive to even the slightest changes in temperature, the cold and sometimes stress. This causes a Raynaud’s attack where the fingers sometimes change colour, but not always, from white, to blue, to red. Raynaud’s phenomenon is a common condition thought to affect up to ten million people in the UK and can impact your life.

Dry January – Awareness 2020

Dry January is the annual movement through which millions of people give up alcohol for the month of January. It is run by the charity Alcohol Change UK.

The rules

  1. No alcohol from when you wake up on New Year’s Day until 1 February.

… And that’s all!

We don’t sell Golden Tickets to give you a day off. If you decide to have a drink, that’s totally up to you. A drier January is still something to be proud of, and your body will thank you!

But if you can make it through the month alcohol-free, you’ll get bigger benefits. The biggest benefit of all is that you’ll see you don’t need alcohol to have fun, go out, stay in, relax or do anything else you might associate with drinking. And knowing that will help you take control of your drinking year-round.

Why do Dry January?

Taking part in Dry January is a chance to ditch the hangover, reduce the waistline, boost your energy and save some serious money, while doing your body a lot of good. More importantly, it’s a way to reset your relationship with alcohol and drink more healthily year-round. Read more about why doing Dry January is a good idea.

Why sign up for Dry January?

People who sign up for Dry January, whether online or via the free app. are TWICE as likely to make it through the whole month alcohol-free compared to those who go it alone.Sign up now

But does it work?

Yes! 72% of people who do Dry January are still drinking less riskily six months later. You can read a summary of the evidence on Dry January’s effectiveness here.

December World AIDS Awareness 2019

World Aids Day December Awareness
World AIDS Day, designated on 1st December every year since 1988.

It is an international day dedicated to raising awareness of the AIDS Pandemic caused by the spread of HIV infection and mourning those who have died of the disease. Government and health officials, non governmental organisations, and individuals around the world observe the day, often with education on AIDS prevention and control.

As of 2017, AIDS has killed between 28.9 million and 41.5 million people worldwide, and an estimated 36.7 million people are living with HIV, making it the most important global public health issues in recorded history.

November Men’s Health Awareness 2019

November Awareness Month 2019
November Awareness Month 2019

Movember, the month formerly known as November, is when brave and selfless men around the world grow a moustache, and women step up to support them, all to raise awareness and funds for men’s health – specifically prostate cancer, testicular cancer, mental health and suicide prevention.

September Urology Awareness 2019

September Urology Awareness
September Urology Awareness

Urology, also known as genitourinary surgery, is the branch of medicine that focuses on surgical and medical diseases of the male and female urinary-tract system and the male reproductive organs.

Urologists treat a wide variety of conditions that affect the urinary system and male reproductive system.

In men, urologists treat:

  • cancers of the bladder, kidneys, penis, testicles, and adrenal and prostate glands
  • prostate gland enlargement
  • erectile dysfunction, or trouble getting or keeping an erection
  • infertility
  • interstitial cystitis, also called painful bladder syndrome
  • kidney diseases
  • kidney stones
  • prostatitis, which is inflammation of the prostate gland
  • urinary tract infections (UTIs)
  • varicoceles, or enlarged veins in the scrotum

In women, urologists treat:

  • bladder prolapse, or the dropping of the bladder into the vagina
  • cancers of the bladder, kidneys, and adrenal glands
  • interstitial cystitis
  • kidney stones
  • overactive bladder
  • UTIs
  • urinary incontinence

In children, urologists treat:

  • bed-wetting
  • blockages and other problems with the urinary tract structure
  • undescended testicles

August Penicillin Awareness 2019

Alexander Fleming discovered Penicillin

Alexander Fleming was born on 6 August 1881, He qualified with distinction in 1906 in 1928, while studying influenza he found a dish with a bacterial ring around the mould this became known as penicillin. Fleming wrote numerous papers on bacteriology, immunology and chemotherapy. In 1944 he was knighted and in 1945 won a noble prize in medicine in 1955 he died of a heart attack.

July Samaritans (Talk To Us) Awareness 2019

Sophie’s Story on how Samaritans helped her out when she was in a difficult situation and how she now has the freedom to run the marathon all thanks to speaking to one of the Samaritans volunteers.

Talk To Us is our annual awareness-raising campaign.

Samaritans are challenging the UK to become better listeners by sharing expert tips on how to be a better listener. Throughout July, Samaritans branches are also holding events throughout the UK and Ireland to raise awareness of the services they offer in their local communities. Visit your local branch website to see what they’re doing during Talk To Us.